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Session II Course Descriptions


An “Animated” Course

animation

An “Animated” Course is an introduction and exploration of traditional cell frame animation. Drawing and sketching skills are recommended. Fundamentals of cartooning, character development and storyboarding will be explored and experienced. Photographic and claymation animation techniques are also topics for this course. Students will use Macintosh computers utilizing Adobe Photoshop and Apple iMovie to prepare a DVD presentation of the final projects.

The class will be watching a documentary movie about animator Chuck Jones and his long career animating Loony Tunes characters for Warner Brothers. Chuck will impart vital animation tips and secrets. Yes, we will watch some classic cartoons in addition to viewing the summer’s best animation offering at the local theater.

Students should be confident in drawing and/or interested in making their drawings and characters come to life.

Enrollment limited to 20 students. Course fee for supplies and materials is $65.00.

Badges
This course awards digital badges for completion of certain competencies.  Check here for more information.

Textbook
Character Animation Crash Course

Instructor
Rusty Nelson, Professor of Art, Visual Communications. B.F.A. Fort Hays State University; M.F.A. Kansas State University



Biomusicology: The Study of Music from a Biological Perspective

music study

How does music affect the brain?  Why is memory enhanced by musical cues?  Exactly how does music function as a form of communication for humans, as well as other species?   The emerging field of Biomusicology addresses such questions from a biological point of view, and music is studied as a natural system that is indispensable to human cultures.

Throughout the course we use readings and research projects, as well as guest lectures by musicians and medical professionals, to investigate the origins of music; the question of animal song; the functions and uses of music; and the universal features of the world’s musical systems and musical behavior.  An important component of the course is an overview of neuromusicology: the study of brain areas involved in music-processing and the cognitive processes associated with music-making.

In Biomusicology, we study many kinds of music made by societies worldwide and consider how people use music in their ritual, cultural and social lives.  Also, as part of our applied study, all students have regular access to the latest instructional technology available in Truman’s Basic Keyboard Skills Lab.  As a class, our goal is to apply specific theories of biomusicology to gain insight into the following:  the therapeutic uses of music in medical treatment; the widespread use of music in audiovisual media such as film and television; the role of music to influence mass behavior; and the use of music to enhance learning.

Badges
This course awards digital badges for completion of certain competencies.  Check here for more information.

Textbook
This Is Your Brain on Music;  a course pack developed by the instructor.

Instructor
Shirley McKamie, Instructor of Musicology, Truman State University.   B.M., University of North Texas; M.A., Truman State University


 
Consumer Health:  The Media’s Role in Your Well-Being

good_heart_dietDoes vitamin C cure the common cold? Is that protein shake really going to build muscle? Is organic food more nutritious? Thanks to the many advances of the 20th century, health has become a valued entity, but health has also become something that can be bought. Although infomercials might seem to be selling a plausible weight loss supplement, how do you know whether that supplement is safe and effective? How do we sift through all of the different health care products and health information coming at you everyday? This course provides a space for students to figure out how to select which health products to use. In this course, we will cover various products relating to different health topics, such as fitness, nutrition, mental health, dental care, skin care, cardiovascular disease, the commercialization of death, the complexities of our healthcare system, and alternative medicine. Advertising is a common tactic used to get individuals to buy these questionable products, and students will spend time exploring the different ways advertisements are constructed. By the end of the course, students will not only be able to figure out which doctor they should go to but also whether acupuncture is a credible practice.

Textbook
TBA

Instructor
Nancy Daley-Moore, Assistant Professor in Health & Exercise Sciences, Truman State University.  B.S. Mercer University, M.P.H. & Ph.D. University of Georgia



German Language and Culture

German clip

This course introduces students to first-semester college German and the rich cultural heritage of German-speaking countries. Students will develop skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing via the “immersion method.”  Every morning session will be conducted as much as possible auf Deutsch: the teacher, preceptors, and students will all communicate in German.  By the end of the three-week session, this intensive approach to language learning will allow students to navigate the German Sprachraum. You should be able to find your way around town, order a meal in a restaurant (and pay for it), and get what you need at the grocery store.

Afternoon sessions will be conducted in English and devoted to German culture. We will touch on German art and history, from the first mentions by Roman writers, through the Dark Ages, the High Middle Ages and into the present. Other activities will include a field trip to a part of Missouri where German was until quite recently the local language, and adventures in cooking and other aspects of daily life.

Textbook
TBA

Instructor
Adam Davis, Professor of English, Truman State University.  BA, MA University of Michigan, PhD University of Missouri



Preparatory College Math

math_symbols2The central focus of this course is a study of algebraic topics including equations and inequalities, algebraic, exponential, and logarithmic functions, graphs, and systems of equations.  Students will work at their own pace through the course topics using the software of the Hawkes Learning System.

In addition to covering algebraic content, students will engage in both individual and collaborative mathematical explorations and problem-solving activities.  An emphasis will be placed on developing students’ critical-thinking skills.  The content of these supplemental activities will be outside the typical mathematics curriculum.

Please note:  This course is designed to have students study algebraic topics at a level commensurate with their previous experience and exposure to algebra.  Students who have not studied algebra previously will start at a lower level than those students with previous experience.  Students who complete and demonstrate mastery of all the algebra course topics during the JBA session will qualify for the opportunity to apply for three college credits for College Algebra through Truman State Univeristy.  Previous experience in algebra will maximize the opportunity for students to earn college credit by successfully completing all of the advanced course topics.

Course Fee for the Hawkes Learning System software is $65.00.

Badges
This course awards digital badges for completion of certain competencies.  Check here for more information.

Textbook
No textbook required

Instructor
}Shawn Logan, Instructor of Mathematics.  B.A., M.A.E., Truman State University.



“Read All About It”  Newspaper Reporting and Production

newsDon’t just live the Joseph Baldwin Academy experience, Report on it! Through this course, students will learn the essentials of journalism and publication design, culminating in the production of a real newspaper for distribution to Academy participants and parents. Through a mixture of readings, discussions, and hands-on activities, students will learn what it takes to be a practicing journalist.

Students will learn what makes a good story, interviewing techniques, photography, and how to bring all that information together into a publication.  Discussions will include ethical concerns in journalism, journalism’s role in society, and the use of social media in the news process. Students will also learn the art of editing. Once stories are written and photos are taken, the news needs to reach the public. Working with inDesign, students will learn the principles of publication design and layout. The session will culminate with the production of a keepsake newspaper for themselves and their peers.

Course fee for class supplies and a field trip to print the newspaper is $65.00.

Badges
This course awards digital badges for completion of certain competencies.  Check here for more information.

Supplies
Students are strongly encouraged to bring a digital camera and items necessary for downloading images (USB cables/card reader). Point and shoot cameras are also acceptable and encouraged.

Textbook
No textbook required.

Instructor
Don Krause, Associate Professor of Communication, Truman State University.  B.A., Western Illinois University; M.A, Ball State University.



The Art and Science of Computer Programming

comp progDo you enjoy tinkering with and using computers, but want to know how they really work?  Do you enjoy using the programs that other people have written, but want to know how to write programs yourself?  This course is an introduction to the art and science of programming, using the Java programming language.  For the first week you will learn the basics of “speaking” in Java and write many simple programs.  During the second week you will build your vocabulary and learn to do more elaborate things with your programs.  During the last week you and your fellow class members will apply your skills to a tournament exercise, programming virtual Java robots that battle in real time on screen.  The course also includes an introduction to the GNU/Linux environment which is used as the development platform.  As an added bonus, this course serves as an excellent introduction to the Computer Science AP course, which also uses Java as the vehicle language.

Badges
This course awards digital badges for completion of certain competencies.  Check here for more information.

Textbook
How to Think Like a Computer Scientist (Java Edition) course pack.

Instructor
Donald Bindner, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Truman State University.  B.S., Northeast Missouri State University; Ph.D., University of Georgia.



The Writer’s Craft

pencil-creative-writing-250x250Emily Dickinson says the experience of a good poem is like having the top of your head come off. The haiku master Basho says it’s like being alive twice. We all have a favorite book or poem, a piece of writing that has moved us to new ways of thinking, feeling, or living in the world. One of the best ways to appreciate such moving writing is to let it move us toward creating our own poems, stories, and essays. In this course we will consider the possibilities and challenges of imaginative writing. We will explore the creative process, from generating ideas to shaping and revising, and we’ll seek to share our work with others—reading, performing, and publishing our collective and individual efforts. You will find out how your own writing process operates by learning how other writers work. Francine Prose says that literature “sets up a series of rules that the writer is instructed to observe, [and] reading will show how these rules have been ignored in the past and the happy outcomes.” We’ll spend our time recklessly learning and ignoring all the rules, remembering the poet John Ashbery’s advice to writers: “Let us leave the obedience school!” In addition to reading, writing, and work shopping, we’ll get out of the classroom to write with our feet, about the world, not as we’ve seen it on TV, but as we really find it, including both on-campus and off-campus explorations. Students who complete this course will grow as poets and storytellers, but also in their broader ability to communicate vividly, as they learn to think about audience and adapt expression to the reactions it provokes.

Badges
This course awards digital badges for completion of certain competencies.  Check here for more information.

Textbooks
A Little White Shadow; Ron Carlson Writes a Story 

Instructor
James D’Agostino, Professor in English, Truman State University.  B.A., Loyola University of Chicago; M.F.A., Indiana University; Ph.D., Western Michigan University.



Underwater Biology

underwaterHave you ever wondered what lurks beneath the serene surface of your favorite fishing hole? In this class you will get to find out! We will learn and practice the techniques that professional biologists use to study the diversity of aquatic organisms living in Missouri. We’ll take field trips to local streams, ponds and lakes to observe organisms in nature and we’ll humanely collect specimens for follow-up studies in the lab. We’ll study fish, crayfish, dragonflies, clams, water lilies, algae, and dozens of other types of creatures that you never knew existed. We’ll set up fresh-water aquaria for observing animal behaviors, learn to identify creatures using taxonomic keys, compare the anatomies of fish and aquatic invertebrates, learn about how scientists describe and classify new species. We’ll use microscopes to study the smaller creatures. Our ultimate goal is to learn how these creatures interact from an ecological perspective. Classes will include lectures for introducing students to new topics and lots of hands-on laboratory work, including group work on projects.

Badges
This course awards digital badges for completion of certain competencies.  Check here for more information.

Textbook
Pond Life (Golden Nature Guide to Common Plants and Animals of North American Ponds and Lakes); A course pack provided by the professor.

Instructor
George Shinn, Professor of Biology, Truman State University. B.S. Washington State University; Ph.D. University of Washington.



Why We Fought: American Wars from World War I to Iraq

war iiThe course covers the major American conflicts from the start of the 20th century to the present conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. While the focus of the course will examine these conflicts from the U.S. foreign policy perspective, some attention is given to the role of domestic public opinion as well as foreign perspectives on the conflicts.

There are three learning objectives for this course. First, students should gain a deeper understanding of US conflicts over the past century and how these conflicts shaped the US into the global leader. Second, students will attain a better theoretical understanding of why countries fight. Finally, students will discuss and attempt to determine what countries can attain from conflict and if it’s worth the price.

Aside from the normal classroom activities, the class will take two field trips. The first will be to Laclede, Missouri to visit the Gen. John J. Pershing Boyhood Home State Historic Site. Students will take a tour the famous US Generals boyhood home and see how he lived and discuss his accomplishments. The second trip will be a two day trip to the World War I Museum in Kansas City Missouri and the Harry S. Truman Library in Independence, Missouri. There they will explore wartime documents and memorabilia before undertaking role-playing activities where students will decide how to deal with the growing differences between the U.S. and its Soviet allies near the end of the war in Europe.

Course Fee for the overnight field trip is $150.00.

Badges
This course awards digital badges for completion of certain competencies.  Check here for more information.

Textbook
Why Nations go to War

Instructor
Michael Rudy, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Truman State University. B.S., Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville; MA, Eastern Illinois University; Ph.D., University of Missouri.