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Session II Course Descriptions

An “Animated” Course

animationAn Animated Course is an introduction and exploration of traditional cell frame animation. Drawing and sketching skills are recommended. Fundamentals of cartooning, character development and storyboarding will be explored and experienced. Photographic and claymation animation techniques are also topics for this course. Students will use Macintosh computers utilizing Adobe Photoshop and Apple iMovie in addition to their own Smart Phones to prepare and upload their animated creations to YouTube.

The class will be watching a documentary movie about animator Chuck Jones and his long career animating Loony Tunes characters for Warner Brothers. Chuck will impart vital animation tips and secrets. Yes, we will watch some classic cartoons in addition to viewing the summer’s best animation offering at the local theater.

Students should be confident in drawing and/or interested in making their drawings and characters come to life.

Enrollment limited to 20 students. Course fee for supplies and materials is $50.00.

Badges
This course awards digital badges for completion of certain competencies.

Textbook

Character Animation Crash Course by Eric Goldberg

Instructor

Rusty Nelson, Professor of Art, Visual Communications. B.F.A. Fort Hays State University; M.F.A. Kansas State University.

 

 
Consumer Health:  The Media’s Role in Your Well-Being

good_heart_diet

Does vitamin C cure the common cold? Is that protein shake really going to build muscle? Is organic food more nutritious? Thanks to the many advances of the 20th century, health has become a valued entity, but health has also become something that can be bought. Although infomercials might seem to be selling a plausible weight loss supplement, how do you know whether that supplement is safe and effective? How do we sift through all of the different health care products and health information coming at you everyday? This course provides a space for students to figure out how to select which health products to use. In this course, we will cover various products relating to different health topics, such as fitness, nutrition, mental health, dental care, skin care, cardiovascular disease, the commercialization of death, the complexities of our healthcare system, and alternative medicine. Advertising is a common tactic used to get individuals to buy these questionable products, and students will spend time exploring the different ways advertisements are constructed. Students will also learn how to create advertisements around a health topic of their choosing. They will get to use iMovie, Garageband, and Canva to create posters, fact sheets, a radio PSA, podcast, and TV spot. By the end of the course, students will be able to deconstruct the advertisements they see around them, be more versatile using technology, and know how to judge the credibility of vitamin supplementation and acupuncture.

Textbook
No Textbook Required

Instructor
Nancy Daley-Moore, Assistant Professor in Health & Exercise Sciences, Truman State University.  B.S. Mercer University, M.P.H. & Ph.D. University of Georgia

 


German Language and Culture

German clip

This course introduces students to first-semester college German and the rich cultural heritage of German-speaking countries. Students will develop skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing via the “immersion method.”  Every morning session will be conducted as much as possible auf Deutsch: the teacher, preceptors, and students will all communicate in German.  By the end of the three-week session, this intensive approach to language learning will allow students to navigate the German Sprachraum. You should be able to find your way around town, order a meal in a restaurant (and pay for it), and get what you need at the grocery store.

Afternoon sessions will be conducted in English and devoted to German culture. We will touch on German art and history, from the first mentions by Roman writers, through the Dark Ages, the High Middle Ages and into the present. Other activities will include a field trip to a part of Missouri where German was until quite recently the local language, and adventures in cooking and other aspects of daily life.

Textbook
TBA

Instructor
Adam Davis, Professor of English, Truman State University.  BA, MA University of Michigan, PhD University of Missouri

 


Preparatory College Math

math_symbols2The central focus of this course is a study of algebraic topics including equations and inequalities, algebraic, exponential, and logarithmic functions, graphs, and systems of equations.  Students will work at their own pace through the course topics using the software of the Hawkes Learning System.

In addition to covering algebraic content, students will engage in both individual and collaborative mathematical explorations and problem-solving activities.  An emphasis will be placed on developing students’ critical-thinking skills.  The content of these supplemental activities will be outside the typical mathematics curriculum.

Please note:  This course is designed to have students study algebraic topics at a level commensurate with their previous experience and exposure to algebra.  Students who have not studied algebra previously will start at a lower level than those students with previous experience.  Students who complete and demonstrate mastery of all the algebra course topics during the JBA session will qualify for the opportunity to apply for three college credits for College Algebra through Truman State Univeristy.  Previous experience in algebra will maximize the opportunity for students to earn college credit by successfully completing all of the advanced course topics.

Course Fee for the Hawkes Learning System software is $65.00.

Badges
This course awards digital badges for completion of certain competencies.

Textbook
No textbook required

Instructor
Shawn Logan, Instructor of Mathematics.  B.A., M.A.E., Truman State University.

 


“Read All About It”  Newspaper Reporting and Production

news

Don’t just live the Joseph Baldwin Academy experience, Report on it! Through this course, students will learn the essentials of journalism, photography and publication design, culminating in the production of a real newspaper for distribution to Academy participants and parents. Through a mixture of readings, discussions, and hands-on activities, students will learn what it takes to be a practicing journalist.

Students will learn what makes a good story, interviewing techniques and journalistic writing styles.  Discussions will include ethical concerns in journalism, journalism’s role in society, and the use of social media in the news process. Students will also learn the art of editing. Students will also explore photography through discussions and practice. Working with inDesign software, students will learn and apply the principles of visual communication. The session will culminate with the production of a keepsake newspaper for themselves and their peers.

Course fee for class supplies and a field trip to print the newspaper is $65.00.

Badges
This course awards digital badges for completion of certain competencies.

Supplies
Students are strongly encouraged to bring a digital camera and items necessary for downloading images (USB cables/card reader). Point and shoot cameras are also acceptable and encouraged.

Textbook
No textbook required.

Instructor
Don Krause, Associate Professor of Communication, Truman State University.  B.A., Western Illinois University; M.A, Ball State University.

 

Reading Between the Panels: Comics, Graphic Novels, and Sequential Art

In his book Understanding Comics Scott McCloud explains that the potential of comics is limitless, but has been constrained by its perception in popular culture. In this course we will explore the true potential of the medium by reading and analyzing comics (also known as graphic novels) as a form of both art and literature. Using McCloud’s Understanding Comics  as a guiding text we will learn about the history of comics as well as ways to interpret the combinations of words and pictures within comics. We will put our understanding of sequential art into conversation with other mediums that use words and pictures to make meaning such as advertisements, art, and film. This course will also invite students to think critically about what they read and to consider the ability of literature to shape our understanding of who we are and  how we interpret the world around us.

Daily activities will include reading, writing, and discussion. While we may try our hand at producing some comics ourselves, artistic ability is not a requirement for this course.  

Badges
TBD

Textbook
Understanding Comics by Scott McCloud, fiction and nonfiction graphic novels TBD

Instructor
Rachel Brown, Instructor of English, Raytown High School. B.A., Truman State University, M.A.E., Truman State University.


The Writer’s Craft

pencil-creative-writing-250x250Emily Dickinson says the experience of a good poem is like having the top of your head come off. The haiku master Basho says it’s like being alive twice. We all have a favorite book or poem, a piece of writing that has moved us to new ways of thinking, feeling, or living in the world. One of the best ways to appreciate such moving writing is to let it move us toward creating our own poems, stories, and essays. In this course we will consider the possibilities and challenges of imaginative writing. We will explore the creative process, from generating ideas to shaping and revising, and we’ll seek to share our work with others—reading, performing, and publishing our collective and individual efforts. You will find out how your own writing process operates by learning how other writers work. Francine Prose says that literature “sets up a series of rules that the writer is instructed to observe, [and] reading will show how these rules have been ignored in the past and the happy outcomes.” We’ll spend our time recklessly learning and ignoring all the rules, remembering the poet John Ashbery’s advice to writers: “Let us leave the obedience school!” In addition to reading, writing, and work shopping, we’ll get out of the classroom to write with our feet, about the world, not as we’ve seen it on TV, but as we really find it, including both on-campus and off-campus explorations. Students who complete this course will grow as poets and storytellers, but also in their broader ability to communicate vividly, as they learn to think about audience and adapt expression to the reactions it provokes.

Badges
This course awards digital badges for completion of certain competencies.

Textbooks
A Little White Shadow; Ron Carlson Writes a Story 

Instructor
James D’Agostino, Professor in English, Truman State University.  B.A., Loyola University of Chicago; M.F.A., Indiana University; Ph.D., Western Michigan University.

 

Environmental Sustainability and Conservation: Alternative Energy

Environmental sustainability is one of the most polarizing and nuanced issues confronting our world today.  In this course students will learn about this growing interdisciplinary field through hands-on means, specifically in regards to energy usage.

This course will examine the hugely complex task of environmental sustainability, specifically through alternative fuel systems.  Students will study, interact with, and design experiments out of units focusing on wind energy, biofuels, solar energy, and hydroelectric systems in addition to discussing and debating environmental ethics.  Students will learn about real-world sustainability initiatives and be given to the opportunity to evaluate and develop sustainable standards and practices as they keep in perspective the various stakeholders these policies and decisions affect.  Truman prioritizes sustainability and incorporates sustainable policies all over campus, and students will be reviewing and analyzing these efforts.

Badges
This course awards digital badges for completion of certain competencies.

Textbooks
TBA

Instructor
Derek Franklin, Instructor of English and Linguistics, Truman State University. B.S., Truman State University

 


Why We Fought: American Wars from World War I to Iraq

war iiThe course covers the major American conflicts from the start of the 20th century to the present conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. While the focus of the course will examine these conflicts from the U.S. foreign policy perspective, some attention is given to the role of domestic public opinion as well as foreign perspectives on the conflicts.

There are three learning objectives for this course. First, students should gain a deeper understanding of US conflicts over the past century and how these conflicts shaped the US into the global leader. Second, students will attain a better theoretical understanding of why countries fight. Finally, students will discuss and attempt to determine what countries can attain from conflict and if it’s worth the price.

Aside from the normal classroom activities, the class will take two field trips. The first will be to Laclede, Missouri to visit the Gen. John J. Pershing Boyhood Home State Historic Site. Students will take a tour the famous US Generals boyhood home and see how he lived and discuss his accomplishments. The second trip will be a two day trip to the World War I Museum in Kansas City Missouri and the Harry S. Truman Library in Independence, Missouri. There they will explore wartime documents and memorabilia before undertaking role-playing activities where students will decide how to deal with the growing differences between the U.S. and its Soviet allies near the end of the war in Europe.

Course Fee for the overnight field trip is $150.00.

Badges
This course awards digital badges for completion of certain competencies.

Textbook
International Politics and Zombies

Instructor
Michael Rudy, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Truman State University. B.S., Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville; MA, Eastern Illinois University; Ph.D., University of Missouri.

 

Zombie Studies 101: Critical Thinking and Understanding of Cultures and Emergencies

This course teaches our students much more than the “do’s” and “do nots” of surviving the zombie apocalypse. Using a combination of films, literature, and discussion, we will study the zombie genre, using the undead as a metaphor to explain the nuances of different cultures and societies. Students will explore many STEM fields along with the humanities, learning practical skills of disaster preparedness alongside critical thinking skills in the classroom.From shelter building, to crisis management we will learn to take care of ourselves and others in times of disaster.  Surviving is only half of the battle.  The films and literature of the zombie oeuvre will serve as a jumping off point as we use zombies as a metaphor for exploring current and historical cultures and societies.The students final project will be to use what we have learned about disaster preparedness and zombies to create a Public Service Announcement that uses their critical thinking skills to link our new knowledge of these ghouls with an actual problem we could all face.  

Badges
TBD

Textbook
TBD

Instructor
Tyler Unsell, Director of Debate and Forensics, Park Hill School District. B.A., Truman State University. M.A.E., Truman State University.