Contact us at: 660-785-5406 or email: tiacademies@truman.edu

Tap To Call
Home » Courses of Study » Session I Course Descriptions

Session I Course Descriptions

Advocacy, Argument, and Persuasion:
Classical Rhetoric in Contemporary Times

debate 2In a culture of 24-hour news, larger-than-life pundits and a blurring of the line between news and commentary, rhetoric and argumentation are a way of life in modern America. Argument now occurs in settings such as the halls of Congress, evening news talk shows, popular sports programming, and local city councils. Advocacy, in the form of advertising, is everywhere.  As consumers of media and participants in an increasingly adversarial culture, learning the critical principles and practices of advocacy and persuasion provides a basis for informed involvement in the world around us.

This course utilizes a perspective rooted in classical rhetorical theory as a mode of critical thinking and public involvement to study the processes of argumentation and persuasion in various interpersonal, political, academic and pop culture settings. Students will begin by engaging theories rooted in the classical rhetoric of the Greeks and Romans and evolve through contemporary models of argument. As a complement to this discussion of argumentation theories, students will employ various models of debate as a means to practice the ideas they learn.  Students will engage in argument by participating in visual argument, in-class debates, political debates and even humor to test their skills. Finally, lessons learned in all settings will be utilized as a framework from which to engage political discourses and persuasive popular media campaigns.

Badges
This course awards digital badges for completion of certain competencies.

Textbook
Thank You for Arguing

Instructor
Jay Self, Associate Professor of Communication, Truman State University.  B.A., Truman State University; M.S. Texas Christian University, Ph.D., University of Kansas

 

Biomusicology: The Study of Music from a Biological Perspective

music study

How does music affect the brain?  Why is memory enhanced by musical cues?  Exactly how does music function as a form of communication for humans, as well as other species?   The emerging field of Biomusicology addresses such questions from a biological point of view, and music is studied as a natural system that is indispensable to human cultures.

Throughout the course we use readings and research projects, as well as guest lectures by musicians and medical professionals, to investigate the origins of music; the question of animal song; the functions and uses of music; and the universal features of the world’s musical systems and musical behavior.  An important component of the course is an overview of neuromusicology: the study of brain areas involved in music-processing and the cognitive processes associated with music-making.

In Biomusicology, we study many kinds of music made by societies worldwide and consider how people use music in their ritual, cultural and social lives.  Also, as part of our applied study, all students have regular access to the latest instructional technology available in Truman’s Basic Keyboard Skills Lab.  As a class, our goal is to apply specific theories of biomusicology to gain insight into the following:  the therapeutic uses of music in medical treatment; the widespread use of music in audiovisual media such as film and television; the role of music to influence mass behavior; and the use of music to enhance learning.

Badges
This course awards digital badges for completion of certain competencies.

Textbook
This Is Your Brain on Music;  a course pack developed by the instructor.

Instructor
Shirley McKamie, Instructor of Musicology, Truman State University.   B.M., University of North Texas; M.A., Truman State University

 

Can You Say That With Your Hands?  An Introduction to American Sign Language and Deaf Culture

signThis course will introduce students to manual communication skills utilized by the Deaf community.   In addition the course will provide insight into the diversity of individuals using manual communication in their unique culture. As a result of this course, students will learn to communicate in conversational situations utilizing finger spelling and American Sign Language.   Students will play word games, role play scenarios, interpret poems or songs and present a children’s book in sign language.  Students will experience communication barriers that will give them a greater understanding of the importance common communication systems.  Videos, lectures and learning opportunities will give insight into the pride of Deaf individuals, the history of Deaf culture and how technology is changing Deaf communities.

This course would be appropriate for individuals investigating numerous careers including Sign Language Interpreters, Audiology, Deaf Education, Speech/Language Pathology, and Special Education.

Badges
This course awards digital badges for completion of certain competencies.

Textbook
Learning American Sign Language, 2nd Ed; Levels I & II – Beginning & Intermediate

Instructor
Sheila Garlock, Assistant Professor of Communication Disorders, Truman State University.  B.S.E., Truman State University; M.A., Truman State University.

 

Clay Castles and Medieval Mugs

na_sw_potteryCeramics is the process of introducing clay to heat in order to make it permanently hard. Potters have been using the ceramic process for thousands of years to make both functional and sculptural objects. In this class, students will learn basic handbuilding ceramics techniques including coiling, slab building and pinch pots to create sculptural castles and creatures that might live in or near them. We will also explore the basics of throwing on the potter’s wheel. In addition to techniques for making, glazing and decorating the surface of their castle and creatures, students will learn about safe practices when working with clay and glazes, talk about basic firing considerations, research the history of castles and potters, and do some creative writing.

No prior experience with clay is necessary.

Enrollment limited to 20 students.  Course fee for supplies and materials is $25.00.

Badges
This course awards digital badges for completion of certain competencies.

Textbook
No textbook required.

Instructor
Wynne Wilbur, Professor of Art, Ceramics, Truman State University.  BA, Bethany College (Kansas); MA, Emporia State University; MFA, University of Florida.

 

Computers in Art and Design

Computer DesignExplore how the computer has been integrated into the image-making processes by incorporating traditional art processes such as drawing and markers with modern Graphic Design software. Learn how professional artists, designers, and illustrators utilize the power of Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and other software to create digital artwork and enhance images to create digital graphics such as maps, posters, and postcards. The basic features of Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator will be explored through tutorials and original artwork will be produced when techniques are mastered. By the end of the course, students will have a digital and print portfolio consisting of several projects. Students will also utilize digital cameras, scanners, and output to laser/inkjet printers. Quad-Core Intel Macintosh computers (the industry standard platform) power this exploration into the realm of digital imagery.

Enrollment limited to 20 students. Course fee for class supplies and materials is $65.00.

Badges
This course awards digital badges for completion of certain competencies.

Textbook
No textbook required.

Instructor
Matthew Derezinski, Associate Professor of Art, Visual Communications, Truman State University. B.F.A., Visual Communications, Kansas State University. M.F.A., Visual Communications, Kansas State University.

 

Exploring the Film Soundtrack: The Role and Aesthetics of Movie Music

How do film composers influence the audience’s emotional response, and in what ways do they create music that elicits a particular location or time period?  How do they balance the music with dialogue?  This course will investigate the development of movie music from the early improvised organ playing of musicians like Fats Waller for silent films, to more recent music from the biggest composers in Hollywood, including Bernard Herrmann, John Williams, Hans Zimmer, Danny Elfman, Max Steiner, James Horner, Alan Silvestri, James Newton Howard, and Howard Shore.

We will investigate how the specific musical elements of melody, harmony, counterpoint, tempo, rhythm, and orchestration can be used to enhance scenes that deal with themes such as romance, sadness, chase, horror, magic, and fantasy.  As a final project, students will create their own sound track to an original movie that they record throughout the session and a field trip will be taken to Take Root Cafe for a private class screening with popcorn.


Badges

This course awards digital badges for completion of certain competencies.

Textbook
TBA

Instructor
Jesse Krebs, Professor of Music, Music Department, Truman State University. B.M.E., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.M., University of North Texas; D.M., Florida State University

 

Genetics 101: The ABCs of DNA

Can you roll your tongue?  Do you have webbed feet?  Why or why not?  Genetics!  We can use genetics to investigate our world, and in this course, you’ll learn the basics of DNA structure, find out what a gene is, and learn about how your genes help make you, you!

Do you own your genes? What are the ethics and laws surrounding genetics such as what decisions can your employer make if they know you have a genetic condition?   We will discuss these topics and more!

Throughout the course we will also be active in the lab, learning about and using many biotech tools.  We will detect evidence of genetic modification in common grocery items, and investigate your own genetics!

Enrollment limited to 24 students

Badges
This course awards digital badges for completion of certain competencies.

Textbook
TBD

Instructor
Sarah Berke, Assistant Professor of Biology, Biology Department, Truman State University. BA Biology and Psychology from Augustana College in Rock Island, IL. Ph.D. Neuroscience from University of Iowa in Iowa City, IA

 

Introduction to Chemistry

Science and Chemistry IconsThe course will introduce you to the scientific process by exploring fundamental concepts in chemistry in the context of contemporary environmental and societal issues.  A broad range of topics will be explored throughout the session, including the atom and atomic structure, molecules and chemical bonding, chemical nomenclature, writing and balancing chemical equations, the mole and molarity, and the relationship between chemical structure and function. You will participate in several laboratory experiences in which you will learn to work safely in the laboratory and make careful observations of chemical reactions and phenomena in order to draw useful conclusions from your experiments.  You will also have the opportunity to explore and share new topics through brief class presentations.

A key component of the course involves inquiry based learning as a means to understand the process by which new scientific knowledge is developed.  For example, in the laboratory you will synthesize a compound of unknown composition and use a variety of tools to deduce the structure of this new material.  Examples of other experiments include determination of water hardness of samples from local sources, the synthesis and analysis of biodiesel, chromatographic characterization of chemical mixtures, analysis of artificial blood, the study of dyes through the making of tie dye T-shirts, as well as the opportunity to develop and perform chemical demonstrations for your peers.

Textbook
The Cartoon Guide to Chemistry and a course packet which includes laboratory experiments and supporting materials for the lecture.

Instructor
Brian Lamp, Professor and Chair of Chemistry, Truman State University.  B.A. Augustana University (SD), Ph.D. Iowa State University

 

Theatre: Onstage and Off

acting 2This course introduces the many facets of theatre from basic acting techniques to theatrical designs.  We will explore principles in the art of acting, engaging students in a variety of valuable pursuits of practical application to every other study in life: cooperative discipline and trust, freeing the imagination, “inhabiting” great ideas, appreciating alternative views, gaining confidence in public communication, and, most importantly, greater physical, vocal, and personal self-awareness.  Our work will include reading and discussion in theory and technique from Stanislovski and more recent masters but will emphasize active workshop learning through extended series of improvisations, physical and vocal imitations and character analysis.  In addition, students will research the many design elements needed to produce a play; scenery, lighting, costumes and make-up.  The best way to learn and understand what it takes to do theatre is by doing!  So, not only will you study theatre, you will be involved in a full-scale production with scenery, lights, sound, costumes and make-up performed onstage to your peers!

Badges
This course awards digital badges for completion of certain competencies.

Supplies
Make-up Kit (The Truman Bookstore will have this available for purchase with the textbooks at check-in.)

Textbook
A course packet prepared by the professor.

Instructor
Ronald M. Rybkowski, Professor of Theatre, Truman State University.  B.A., Whittier College; M.F.A., California State University, Fullerton

 

The Human Lab

The human body is the most amazing machine on the planet. It is a complex arrangement of interdependent systems that is powerful, adaptive…and is made to move. Through examining the systems of the human body and how they interact with the environment you will eplore the wonder of movement and its relationship to health.

This course is designed to teach students about the human body, specifically related to movement. Students examine the basic structure of the human body; the skeletal system, the muscular system and cardiovascular system and visit a human cadaver lab. Expanding on that knowledge, students explore other bodily systems and how they relate to health and physical activity. A specific emphasis will be placed on disease prevention through physical activity and include Hearsaver First Aid and CPR. Although there will be some lecture-based content, much of the course will be laboratory activities requiring student participation to learn basic concepts related to motor learning, exercise physiology, bio-mechanics, and health.

Badges
This course awards digital badges for completion of certain competencies.

Textbook
The Anatomy Coloring Book(4th ed.) by Wynn Kapit and Lawerence Elson
American College of Sports Medicine Complete Guide to Fitness & Health(2nd ed.) by Barbara Bushman(editor)
Heartsaver First Aid CPR AED Student Workbook American Hart Association Item: 15-1018

Instructor
Evonne Bird, Instructor, Health and Exercise Science, Truman State University. B.S., Physical Education, Eastern Montana College. M.S., Sports Health, Texas Tech University

 

Why We Fight: A Historical Perspective of Crusades and Jihad

war-peace-2-aWe explore the ideology and history of war from antiquity to the present.  We begin by considering the ideas in On Aggression, an influential work by the Nobel Prize-winning zoologist, Konrad Lorenz. We then look at reasons to fight beginning with Homer’s Illiad—a tale of war that both entertained and educated ancient Greece. A radically different form of combat confronts us in the 9th-century conversion literature, The Heliand. We next discuss the 12th-century Song of the Nibelungs, the heroic epic that advocates a Germanic warrior ethos tempered by a knightly code of honor. In the same century, the Islamic jihad of Saladin retakes the Holy city of Jerusalem city. We examine his motives and justification for fighting.  We compare them with the aims of the Ottoman Empire, the Islamic superpower of the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries whose expansion culminated in the blockade of Vienna. Finally, we explore the reasons to fight during the First and Second World Wars. The course concludes with an inquiry about how our course might relate to contemporary events in the 21st century.

Textbooks
On Aggression; Iliad; The Heliand: The Old Saxon Gospel; The Song of the Nibelungs; All Quiet on the Western Front

Instructor
Ernst Hintz, Professor of German, Truman State University.  B.A. Fordham University, M.A Ruprecht-Karl Universität Heidelberg, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison